Kate Dempsey Sorry Business Seminar

Kate Dempsey Sorry Business Seminar

Sorry Business Seminar: Dr Kate Dempsey

Sorry Business: A Kleinian perspective on Apology and Reparation seminar

‘Sorry business’ is a term used by First Nation People’s of Australia to encompass the rituals and ceremonies associated with death and grieving. But Australia has a sorry business, left unattended and unacknowledged. Colonisation in Australia (as elsewhere) has left a legacy of inequality, trauma, shame, guilt, and exploitation. In Requiem for a Nun, Faulkner writes the famous line that ‘the past is never dead. It’s not even past.’

In this paper, I argue that the past is still with us all (whether colonist/settler, migrant, dispossessed, white or black) and that lack of apology and reparation means wounds of the past do not heal. As a white Australian, I can’t say how, when or why apology is acceptable but I want to explore why apology is complex in a social context and how cultural forgetfulness negatively impacts on reparation.

I look at attempts to say sorry, from a Kleinian perspective, incorporating her idea of reparation and I use restorative justice principles – most often employed in the criminal justice system – as a guide to enacting apology. Klein deals with personal relationships, not whole societies or cultures and not with formal apologies given by governments or organisations on behalf of large groups for the deeds of those who came before. But perhaps illumination can occur by examining her ideas. She notes that the move to a depressive position comes first from the one who has done wrong, realising this truth, mourning loss and wanting to repair.

But if apology has an unspoken aim to triumph over a past, or has a sentiment of grievance, anger, or guilt at its heart, it is ‘manic reparation’ (Klein 1935). This is the fantasy desire that the division being experienced should go away. It is the belief that by simply apologising we can return to a place of oneness, to have the other stop complaining or have the feeling of guilt for damage done, assuaged. It is fantasy and therefore manic because the damage has in fact been done and the prior state can never return. Relationship with the other is damaged by past events and apology is only true when this brokenness is acknowledged and responsibility accepted.

 

Seminar, recorded via Zoom

Reparation is an embodied, enacted and relational process. Without reparation, we cannot move as individuals or as a nation to a mature (depressive) position. The task is to find the liminal space so that growth can occur, rather than all parties feeling either overwhelmed by what we cannot fix or defensively assuming all will be well following apology.

Finally, I discuss the term Dadirri (Ungunmerr 1988) from the Daly River People (the Ngangikurungkurr) as a way for white settler descendants to begin to come to a place of remembering and mourning that offers both an internal maturing in the depressive position, but also an outward enactment of reparation. It is a term that has no comparable meaning in English. But it points the way to quiet listening and deep understanding of the other, which is a good place to start.

Klein, M. (1935/1975) ‘A Contribution to the Psychogenesis of Manic-Depressive States’ Writings Vol 1. Free Press (Macmillan) NY. Available at https://www.sas.upenn.edu/~cavitch/pdf-
library/Klein_Contribution.pdf

Ungunmerr, MR. (1988) Dadirri: Inner Deep Listening and Quiet Still Awareness accessed 2.02.2019 from www.miriamrosefoundation.org.au

 

Dr Kate Dempsey

Dr Kate Dempsey (PhD) is an organisational consultant who has successfully operated her own business, Kate Dempsey & Associates, for more than two decades. She assists businesses with change management and organisational review.

Prior to her consulting work, Kate held a number of positions in the public sector and throughout her career, she has been involved in many Boards and Committees – either appointed or elected to represent constituents.

In addition to her consulting work, Kate is an academic who has taught Leadership and Managing Change to Masters level students at Monash University and Latrobe University and also to Bachelor of Business students at Swinburne University since 2006. She has a PhD in the psychology of leadership.

Dr Dempsey is a member of the NIODA Academic Board of Governance.

About NIODA

The National Institute of Organisation Dynamics Australia (NIODA) offers internationally renowned post-graduate education and research, and decades of experience consulting with Australian organisations.

The study of organisation dynamics brings together socio-technical and psychoanalytic disciplines to explore the unconscious dynamics that exist in every group, team or organisation. Learning more about these theories, and reflecting on the experience of them, can support leaders and managers to unlock great potential in their organisations, tackling issues through a whole new light.

Contact

info@nioda.org.au

Get In Touch

PO box 287, Collins Street West,
Melbourne  8007  Australia
+61 414 529 867
info@nioda.org.au

This Get In Touch form is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Prof Susan Long seminar: Organisational Role Analysis

Prof Susan Long seminar: Organisational Role Analysis

Seminar: Prof Susan Long

The Transforming Experience Framework, Organisational Role Analysis and Abductive Logic. Seminar on 12 August 2020 online

6-8 pm Wednesday 12 August 2020

Seminar, online from Australia via Zoom

Prof Susan Long (PhD)

Dr Susan Long

Susan Long is Director, Research and Scholarship at NIODA. She was formerly Professor of Creative and Sustainable Organisation at RMIT University in Melbourne.

Currently, she supervises research students and conducts organisational research. Susan also teaches and supervises doctoral candidates at different universities including a Professional Doctorate conducted at the Melbourne Institute of Creative Arts Therapy and supported through the National Institute of Organisation Dynamics Australia (NIODA), teaches in the INSEAD Master of Coaching and Consulting program in Singapore.

As an organisational consultant in private practice Susan works with organisational change, executive coaching, board development, role analysis, team development and management training. She originally trained as a clinical psychologist and psychotherapist.

Susan’s experience of working with people as individuals and in groups and organisations gives her a broad perspective on management practices. Susan’s capacity as a teacher and organisational consultant/ researcher has led her to be invited onto the boards of prestigious organisations and elected onto the committees of professional bodies.

She is a member of Comcare’s advisory board for the Center of Excellence for Research into Mental Health at Work and a former member of the Board of the Judicial College of Victoria. She was the founding President of Group Relations Australia and a past president of the International Society for the Psychoanalytic Study of Organisations. Her participative research has attracted grants through the Australian research Council and industry. She has published ten books and many journal articles.

Transforming Experience Framework, Organisational Role Analysis and Abductive Logic.

This seminar will look at the method of Organisational Role Analysis (ORA) using the Transforming Experience Framework (TEF). Abductive logic is the logic grounding this method.

Professor Long will present some case material in order to show how these ideas are used. The case material will be drawn from her experience with clients but will not feature in detail any actual client. She will provide a case amalgam. All material is de-identified.

 

Transforming Experience Framework seminar: Prof Susan Long

Day(s)

:

Hour(s)

:

Minute(s)

:

Second(s)

Prof Susan Long seminar

6-8 pm Wednesday 12th August 2020

Live interactive online session via Zoom

For only:

* $35 full seminar including small group discussion and plenary discussion with Prof Long

* Special $20 for members of Alumni of Organisation Dynamics (AODA)

Places limited .. don’t miss out!

When & Where

Prof Susan Long seminar

Date

Wednesday 12 August 2020

Time

6 – 8 pm

Location

Live interactive online session via Zoom

About NIODA

The National Institute of Organisation Dynamics Australia (NIODA) offers internationally renowned post-graduate education and research, and decades of experience consulting with Australian organisations.

The study of organisation dynamics brings together socio-technical and psychoanalytic disciplines to explore the unconscious dynamics that exist in every group, team or organisation. Learning more about these theories, and reflecting on the experience of them, can support leaders and managers to unlock great potential in their organisations, tackling issues through a whole new light.

Contact

info@nioda.org.au

Get In Touch

PO box 287, Collins Street West,
Melbourne  8007  Australia
+61 414 529 867
info@nioda.org.au

This Get In Touch form is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Working from home for years tips

Working from home for years tips

Working from home tips

I've been working from home for over two years. At first I found it difficult, but now I love it. Here's my tips to help you...

Working from home for years – tips

I’ve been working from home for the last two years, at first I found it very difficult, but now I love it! Here are my tips:

A little over two years ago, I started working for NIODA offering a real, dinky-di, fully accredited Master of Leadership and Management degree (teaching the people side of things) with an average student age of 48.  I started from home and at that stage, I had meetings in the city one day a week.  Initially, I found it very difficult to get a grip of the organisation’s culture, ways of doing things, approval tree and how to take up my role.  In the beginning, the days in the city were vital to my development in my role within the organisation and connection with staff. All meetings were face-to-face or over the telephone or voice on Skype.  If we were working on finalising a document, would speak on the phone, one would read it out and the other edit it and then email it to the other person to check for errors.

Oh, how times have changed!

We introduced Zoom into the meeting space.  This enables us to meet with a number of people together ‘Brady bunch style’ and one can see the faces of those who are speaking and interaction is deeper than via the telephone.  We also started using Google docs, allowing a number of people to have a document open together and to edit and comment on it together in real-time whilst across the telephone (or Zoom if two or more).

Let me give you an example:

Late last year we needed to create a committee to address the sexual assault and sexual harassment that a new study revealed was rife across the university sector. We put together a task force including: a lawyer who had worked on the development of the legal definition of rape in Victoria; a retired gynaecologist who had headed up the rape trauma centre at the Royal Woman’s Hospital and was a member of our human research ethics committee; a male student who works in the leadership space; and a member of the teaching staff who is also the student advisor. If we had chosen to meet face to face, with travel times, each member would have had to take half a day off work. However, we elected to meet over Zoom and therefore each member only had to schedule an hour from their busy work schedule to attend. So we met together with regularly scheduled meetings on Zoom. Each meeting began with ‘reflection time’ or a ‘check-in’ for ten minutes which enabled everyone to express where they were at and what they were bringing to this meeting, and then we got down to business. We achieved all that we set out to do. We developed the Sexual Misconduct policy on Google docs over several meetings. The implications of each section of the policy were discussed at length and edited in real-time to the approval of all in attendance. We then developed a webpage specifically covering advice and information pertaining to students and staff and sexual misconduct and determined the best methods for training techniques and programs for staff and students. All this whilst building a level of camaraderie amongst the committee. We connected and then got down to business to address the areas required of us.

This is just one example, this happens across different areas of the organisation every day.

 

Working from home tips:

Tip 1: Core essentials

I have school-age children and each day (until COVID-19) either drop them off or pick them up. On occasions, meetings are scheduled near to school drop pick up time. So I drive to the school early, connect my computer to my phone via hotspot, open Zoom and Google docs and get started, all whilst sitting in my car. Often the meetings finish just as my children arrive. I drive them home and then return to my desk to finish the afternoon.

Tip 2: Find a quiet spot

I am fortunate to have a lovely workspace in a studio, separate from the main house, so I can work without interruption. That being said, my dog has barked on occasion in the middle an important meeting (I have got much better at using the mute function). I get up early and get my household chores done, and then ‘leave for work’ this helps me focus. So I encourage you to find a space in which you can work uninterrupted.

Tip 3: Headphones

I have a good set of headphones and microphone, so if my kids do barge in, they cannot hear what is happening in the meeting and I let them know what time it will finish and I can help them then.

Tip 4: Work a normal day

It is easy to pull out the computer at any time and work.  However, it is important to switch off and have family/hobby/relaxation time.  I don’t send, check or respond to emails outside of my normal work hours, including the weekend. Whilst working I stay focussed, so if I have a chore to attend to, I will do this during my lunch break.

Tip 5: Reach out to colleagues

If I am struggling to complete a piece of work, I now know I can call on my colleagues to find someone who can help me within it. We schedule a meeting and open in it Google docs and get down to business. This helps to get those jobs done that I keep putting off because I have some sort of block to attending to them. Often, we just get started and then I am fine and can complete the task on my won.

Tip 6: Schedule zoom meetings

Humans are social creatures. We can do so much more together. Meetings are vital and these are scheduled throughout the day and this keeps me and everyone on track. Visual meetings (on Zoom) are great to see everyone on screen.  There is a much stronger connection than speaking on the phone. It can also be awesome to screen share.

Tip 7: Check-in ‘reflections’

The ten minutes check-in ‘reflections’ are a wonderful time to stay connected and to ensure the pulse of the organisation is a positive one, or if not, those who are struggling can be supported.

Tip 8: Either all face-to-face or all virtual

It is difficult to manage a meeting with some in the room and others online, as those online often miss what is being said, or get forgotten as the meeting progresses. I prefer meetings that all either all virtual or all face-to-face.

Tip 9: Anything is possible

Although somewhat hectic to get the tech sorted, NIODA changed all face-to-face classes to live interactive online sessions, without missing or cancelling a class. Just recently we held an online public lecture with an international leader in the field with 78 people on Zoom, and it was interactive!

 

Before COVID-19 I was catching the train to the city once a month and now that is not happening at all. Yet I am still able to further the organisation and develop within my role at work. I am connected to fellow staff. I work a full eight-hour day and am still available in the evenings and mornings for my family. I don’t have to pack or buy my lunch (I love reheating left-overs). I don’t have to travel or an hour each day. I have reduced my global footprint. Google and Zoom are my friends. Life is good!

Ms Sally Mussared
Director of Administration, NIODA

6 April 2020

Working from home for years, tips

ps Are you a leader or manager and would like to learn more about what NIODA is all about? Have a look at the NIODA Master of Leadership and Management (Organisation Dynamics) course.

Links

for Working from home for years – tips

Zoom: conferencing software which is free and works on PC and mac and does not require any other software licences to operate.

Google docs: word processing software which allows a number of people to work on the same document at the same time.

 

Working from home for years – tips by Sally Mussared

Working into the Future: Symposium 2020

Working into the Future: Symposium 2020

WORKING INTO THE FUTURE

BUILDING INDIVIDUAL & ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE  

BEYOND 2020

WORKING INTO THE FUTURE

BUILDING INDIVIDUAL & ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE

BEYOND 2020

NIODA'S 4th Annual Symposium

9, 10 & 11 September 2020

Working into the future: Building individual and organisational capacities beyond 2020

This symposium focuses on how organisations can best equip themselves for working into a complex future where industries and professions are interconnected globally, technologically and are interconnected through diversity in and between our organisations. In addition, the importance of connectedness to the local community becomes evident. Twenty-twenty is a year where we have twenty years of experience in the twenty-first century with many indications of what is to come. The context includes environmental issues, workforce diversity, political and technological changes. Internally we need to address organisational governance, leadership capabilities, stakeholder engagement and organisational culture.

What are the capacities that will enable organisations to thrive in the future? Many of these are intangible, not easily measured, yet critical to the health and success of an organisation. For instance: the capacities to work with diverse and complex differences between people and ideas; the capacity to withhold judgement and reflect on processes alongside the capacity to make informed decisions and act decisively; and, the capacity to see and work with the interconnectedness between the organisation, its purpose, tasks, people and context.

The Symposium is an opportunity for industries and organisations to interact and think together with experienced socioanalytic professionals. It is a timely opportunity to consider the primary issues of leading organisations in the twenty-first century. It offers both theoretical and strongly practical approaches.

Keynote speaker: Dr Jim Krantz

The Century of the System: Complexity and Interconnectedness in our Social, Organizational and Community Lives.

This presentation discusses how systems thinking provides a lens that is essential for understanding today’s challenges.

Our highly complex, globalized, information-intensive world is comprised of interdependent and inter-locking systems rather than free-standing organizations. Only through understanding how these systems operate will we be able to identify and address root causes.

By recognizing the importance of systems thinking and systemic responses, leaders and their teams can craft more effective, collaborative approaches to the complex situations they face. Topics will include:

  • What is a system, how do they work and why systems thinking has become so critical?
  • Where systems thinking comes from and how it connects with other ways of thinking and other approaches to problem-solving.
  • Leadership, as understood from a systemic perspective.
  • The psychological background to groups and organizations in contemporary organizations.
  • Reframing today’s organizational challenges in systems terms.

James Krantz is an organizational consultant and researcher from New York City, whose principal interests are in the impact of emerging trends on the exercise of leadership and authority; the social and technical dimensions of new forms of work organization; and the unconscious background to work and organizational life. He is the Managing Principal of Worklab, a consulting firm in New York City that focuses on strategy implementation, leadership development, and helping organizations confront the need for change.

Working into the Future: Symposium 2020

Day(s)

:

Hour(s)

:

Minute(s)

:

Second(s)

Working into the future: Symposium 2020

for $250 live interactive online. 
**Early bird only $190 – Don’t miss out!

All sessions will be recorded and made available to symposium members, so you can see all the sessions, no matter what your timezone!

🇦🇺

Melbourne Australia
Wednesday 9 September

5.00 – 7.00 pm Opening, Introduction & Panel discussion

Thursday 10 September

9.00 – 11.00 am Keynote speaker Dr Jim Krantz
5.00 – 7.00 pm Parallel papers
7.00 – 9.00 pm Parallel papers

Friday 11 September

9.00 – 11.00 am Parallel papers
5.00 – 7.00 pm Parallel papers
7.00 – 9.00 pm Panel & Closing reflections

🇺🇸

New York, USA
Wednesday 9 September

3.00 – 5.00 am Opening, Introduction & Panel discussion
7.00 – 9.00 pm Keynote speaker Dr Jim Krantz

Thursday 10 September

3.00 – 5.00 am Parallel papers
5.00 – 7.00 am Parallel papers
7.00 – 9.00 pm Parallel papers

Friday 11 September

3.00 – 5.00 am Parallel papers
5.00 – 7.00 am Panel & Closing reflections

🇬🇧

London, UK
Wednesday 9 September

8.00 – 10.00 am Opening, Introduction & Panel discussion

Thursday 10 September

12.00 – 2.00 am Keynote speaker Dr Jim Krantz
8.00 – 10.00 am Parallel papers
10.00 – 12.00 noon Parallel papers

Friday 11 September

12.00 – 2.00 am Parallel papers
8.00 – 10.00 am Parallel papers
10.00 – 12.00 noon Panel & Closing reflections

🇸🇬

Singapore
Wednesday 9 September

3.00 – 5.00 pm Opening, Introduction & Panel discussion

Thursday 10 September

7.00 – 9.00 am Keynote speaker Dr Jim Krantz
3.00 – 5.00 pm Parallel papers
5.00 – 7.00 pm Parallel papers

Friday 11 September

7.00 – 9.00 am Parallel papers
3.00 – 5.00 pm Parallel papers
5.00 – 7.00 pm Panel & Closing reflections

Last year the 2019 Symposium was:

Building Healthy & Ethical Organisational Culture

The proceedings and papers from this event can be read by clicking the link below

About NIODA

The National Institute of Organisation Dynamics Australia (NIODA) offers internationally renowned post-graduate education and research, and decades of experience consulting with Australian organisations.

The study of organisation dynamics brings together socio-technical and psychoanalytic disciplines to explore the unconscious dynamics that exist in every group, team or organisation. Learning more about these theories, and reflecting on the experience of them, can support leaders and managers to unlock great potential in their organisations, tackling issues through a whole new light.

Contact

info@nioda.org.au

Get In Touch

PO box 287, Collins Street West,
Melbourne  8007  Australia
+61 414 529 867
info@nioda.org.au

This Get In Touch form is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

‘Sorry Business’ Seminar: Dr Kate Dempsey

‘Sorry Business’ Seminar: Dr Kate Dempsey

Sorry Business Seminar: Dr Kate Dempsey

Sorry Business: A Kleinian perspective on Apology and Reparation seminar on 13 May 2020 in Melbourne

6-8 pm Wednesday 13 May 2020

Seminar, online from Australia via Zoom

Dr Kate Dempsey (PhD)

Kate Dempsey is an organisational consultant who has successfully operated her own business, Kate Dempsey & Associates, for more than two decades. She assists businesses with change management and organisational review.

Prior to her consulting work, she held a number of positions in the public sector and throughout her career, she has been involved in many Boards and Committees – either appointed or elected to represent constituents.

In addition to her consulting work, Kate is an academic who has taught Leadership and Managing Change to Masters level students at Monash University and Latrobe University and also to Bachelor of Business students at Swinburne University since 2006. She has a PhD in the psychology of leadership.

‘Sorry business’ is a term used by First Nation People’s of Australia to encompass the rituals and ceremonies associated with death and grieving. But Australia has a sorry business, left unattended and unacknowledged. Colonisation in Australia (as elsewhere) has left a legacy of inequality, trauma, shame, guilt, and exploitation. In Requiem for a Nun, Faulkner writes the famous line that ‘the past is never dead. It’s not even past.’

In this paper, I argue that the past is still with us all (whether colonist/settler, migrant, dispossessed, white or black) and that lack of apology and reparation means wounds of the past do not heal. As a white Australian, I can’t say how, when or why apology is acceptable but I want to explore why apology is complex in a social context and how cultural forgetfulness negatively impacts on reparation.

I look at attempts to say sorry, from a Kleinian perspective, incorporating her idea of reparation and I use restorative justice principles – most often employed in the criminal justice system – as a guide to enacting apology. Klein deals with personal relationships, not whole societies or cultures and not with formal apologies given by governments or organisations on behalf of large groups for the deeds of those who came before. But perhaps illumination can occur by examining her ideas. She notes that the move to a depressive position comes first from the one who has done wrong, realising this truth, mourning loss and wanting to repair.

But if apology has an unspoken aim to triumph over a past, or has a sentiment of grievance, anger, or guilt at its heart, it is ‘manic reparation’ (Klein 1935). This is the fantasy desire that the division being experienced should go away. It is the belief that by simply apologising we can return to a place of oneness, to have the other stop complaining or have the feeling of guilt for damage done, assuaged. It is fantasy and therefore manic because the damage has in fact been done and the prior state can never return. Relationship with the other is damaged by past events and apology is only true when this brokenness is acknowledged and responsibility accepted.

Reparation is an embodied, enacted and relational process. Without reparation, we cannot move as individuals or as a nation to a mature (depressive) position. The task is to find the liminal space so that growth can occur, rather than all parties feeling either overwhelmed by what we cannot fix or defensively assuming all will be well following apology.

Finally, I discuss the term Dadirri (Ungunmerr 1988) from the Daly River People (the Ngangikurungkurr) as a way for white settler descendants to begin to come to a place of remembering and mourning that offers both an internal maturing in the depressive position, but also an outward enactment of reparation. It is a term that has no comparable meaning in English. But it points the way to quiet listening and deep understanding of the other, which is a good place to start.

Klein, M. (1935/1975) ‘A Contribution to the Psychogenesis of Manic-Depressive States’ Writings Vol 1. Free Press (Macmillan) NY. Available at https://www.sas.upenn.edu/~cavitch/pdf-
library/Klein_Contribution.pdf

Ungunmerr, MR. (1988) Dadirri: Inner Deep Listening and Quiet Still Awareness accessed 2.02.2019 from www.miriamrosefoundation.org.au

 

Sorry Business seminar: Dr Kate Dempsey

Day(s)

:

Hour(s)

:

Minute(s)

:

Second(s)

Dr Kate Dempsey seminar

6-8 pm Wednesday 13th May 2020

Live interactive online session via Zoom

For only:

* $35 including light refreshments

* Special $20 for members of Alumni of Organisation Dynamics (AODA)

Places limited .. don’t miss out!

When & Where

Dr Kate Dempsey seminar

Date

Wednesday 13 May 2020

Time

6 – 8 pm

Location

Live interactive online session via Zoom

About NIODA

The National Institute of Organisation Dynamics Australia (NIODA) offers internationally renowned post-graduate education and research, and decades of experience consulting with Australian organisations.

The study of organisation dynamics brings together socio-technical and psychoanalytic disciplines to explore the unconscious dynamics that exist in every group, team or organisation. Learning more about these theories, and reflecting on the experience of them, can support leaders and managers to unlock great potential in their organisations, tackling issues through a whole new light.

Contact

info@nioda.org.au

Get In Touch

PO box 287, Collins Street West,
Melbourne  8007  Australia
+61 414 529 867
info@nioda.org.au

This Get In Touch form is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Pin It on Pinterest

?>