Working into the Future: Symposium 2020

Working into the Future: Symposium 2020

WORKING INTO THE FUTURE

BUILDING INDIVIDUAL & ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE  

BEYOND 2020

WORKING INTO THE FUTURE

BUILDING INDIVIDUAL & ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE

BEYOND 2020

NIODA'S 4th Annual Symposium

Thursday 10 & Friday 11 September 2020

Working into the future: Building individual and organisational capacities beyond 2020

This symposium focusses on how organisations can best equip themselves for working into a complex future where industries and professions are interconnected globally, technologically and are interconnected through diversity in and between our organisations. In addition, the importance of connectedness to the local community becomes evident. Twenty-twenty is a year where we have twenty years of experience in the twenty-first century with many indications of what is to come. The context includes environmental issues, workforce diversity, political and technological changes. Internally we need to address organisational governance, leadership capabilities, stakeholder engagement and organisational culture.

What are the capacities that will enable organisations to thrive in the future? Many of these are intangible, not easily measured, yet critical to the health and success of an organisation. For instance: the capacities to work with diverse and complex differences between people and ideas; the capacity to withhold judgement and reflect on processes alongside the capacity to make informed decisions and act decisively; and, the capacity to see and work with the interconnectedness between the organisation, its purpose, tasks, people and context.

The Symposium is an opportunity for industries and organisations to interact and think together with experienced socioanalytic professionals. It is a rich day for taking the time to consider the primary issues of leading organisations in the twenty-first century. It offers both theoretical and strongly practical approaches.

Beyond the Australian drought and bushfires, the COVID-19 virus is dominating global conditions in 2020. Current indications are that the virus will be strongly diminished by September 2020 and that the need for social distancing will no longer apply. However, if this is not the case our contingency plan is to hold the symposium via zoom (internet). At NIODA we are rapidly gaining experience in this modality with classes and large events and are confident that a quality symposium can be managed in this way.

Keynote speaker: Dr Jim Krantz

The Century of the System: Complexity and Interconnectedness in our Social, Organizational and Community Lives.

This presentation discusses how systems thinking provides a lens that is essential for understanding today’s challenges.

Our highly complex, globalized, information-intensive world is comprised of interdependent and inter-locking systems rather than free-standing organizations. Only through understanding how these systems operate will we be able to identify and address root causes.

By recognizing the importance of systems thinking and systemic responses, leaders and their teams can craft more effective, collaborative approaches to the complex situations they face. Topics will include:

  • What is a system, how do they work and why systems thinking has become so critical?
  • Where systems thinking comes from and how it connects with other ways of thinking and other approaches to problem-solving.
  • Leadership, as understood from a systemic perspective.
  • The psychological background to groups and organizations in contemporary organizations.
  • Reframing today’s organizational challenges in systems terms.

James Krantz is an organizational consultant and researcher from New York City, whose principal interests are in the impact of emerging trends on the exercise of leadership and authority; the social and technical dimensions of new forms of work organization; and the unconscious background to work and organizational life. He is the Managing Principal of Worklab, a consulting firm in New York City that focuses on strategy implementation, leadership development, and helping organizations confront the need for change.

Call for Paper Presentations

This is a call for papers in the following areas:
● Organisational capacity to work with diverse and complex differences between people
● Reflexive and reflective practice
● Organisational responses to climate change and their responses
● The effect of technological changes on organisations
● Governance and leadership in 2020 and beyond
● Building organisational cultures for the future

We invite abstracts for papers to be submitted for selection by Friday 29 May 2020 and presenters will be advised by Monday 22 June

Abstracts should be up to 300 words in length plus references.

Paper presentations will be 35 minutes long, followed by 15 minutes of discussion and reflection and 10 minutes of group discussion.

Applicants are requested to include a photograph and short biography.

Working into the Future: Symposium 2020

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Working into the future: Symposium 2020

6.30 – 8 pm Thursday 10 September for a panel discussion and two-course dinner (including drinks) followed by…

9 am – 5 pm Friday 11 September for a full day including keynote speaker, parallel paper presentations, reflection, morning & afternoon tea & lunch

for $480 at the Melbourne Zoo, Parkville, Melbourne, Australia. 
**Super early bird only $400 – Don’t miss out!

Last year the 2019 Symposium was:

Building Healthy & Ethical Organisational Culture

The proceedings and papers from this event can be read by clicking the link below

When & Where

Working into the future:

Building individual & organisational culture beyond 2020

DATE:
Panel discussion & dinner Thursday 10 September,
followed by a full day Friday 11 September 2020

TIME:
6.30 – 8 pm on Thursday
9 am – 4:45 pm on Friday

 LOCATION:
Melbourne Zoo, Rainforest & Bong Su rooms
Elliot Avenue, Parkville, Melbourne Australia

When & Where

Working into the future:

Building individual & organisational culture beyond 2020

DATE:
Panel discussion & dinner Thursday 10 September,
followed by a full day Friday 11 September 2020

TIME:
6.30 – 8 pm on Thursday
9 am – 4:45 pm on Friday

 LOCATION:
Melbourne Zoo, Rainforest & Bong Su rooms
Elliot Avenue, Parkville, Melbourne Australia

About NIODA

The National Institute of Organisation Dynamics Australia (NIODA) offers internationally renowned post-graduate education and research, and decades of experience consulting with Australian organisations.

The study of organisation dynamics brings together socio-technical and psychoanalytic disciplines to explore the unconscious dynamics that exist in every group, team or organisation. Learning more about these theories, and reflecting on the experience of them, can support leaders and managers to unlock great potential in their organisations, tackling issues through a whole new light.

Contact

info@nioda.org.au

Get In Touch

PO box 287, Collins Street West,
Melbourne  8007  Australia
+61 414 529 867
info@nioda.org.au

This Get In Touch form is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Reparative Leadership in 2020

Reparative Leadership in 2020

Is Reparative Leadership possible in 2020: Socio-Analytic Dialogue and its elusive quest

by Dr Bruno Boccara

Is Reparative Leadership possible in 2020?  Dr Bruno Boccara considers Socio-Analytic Dialogue and its elusive quest…

Is Reparative Leadership possible in 2020? by Bruno Boccara

Disagreements about policies are often the consequences of deeper psychosocial issues, which in turn are displaced into the public policy sphere. The daunting challenges of our times will only be successfully addressed if societal level unconscious dynamics are also accounted for. While incorporating a systems and psychosocial dynamics perspective to public policy remains in its infancy, approaches such as Socio-Analytic Dialogue allow governments and their constituents to do this important work.

In response to the increasing ubiquitousness of perverse societal dynamics, Socio-Analytic Dialogue emphasises reflectiveness, shared meaning, and empathic availability through reparative leadership. The latter is achieved, in part, through the promotion of citizens’ internalisation of how their country functions as a social system and through positive identification between subgroups in society. Sadly, albeit unsurprisingly, I have found that encouraging countries to participate in Socio-Analytic Dialogue is not straightforward.

For example, in spite of its relevance to a country like France, in which we witness the country nearing a breaking point, President Macron – who was contacted through his chief economic adviser while still a candidate – showed no interest in these ideas despite him undoubtedly having the intellect and drive to work in a psychosocial and systemic way. What has transpired since Macron’s election, be it the yellow jackets (Gilets Jaunes) protest movement or the pensions reform strikes, the longest and most violent of the last 40 years, clearly highlights the inability of his government to engage in a meaningful dialogue with its constituents. Macron, whose popularity collapsed, has become a derided and often hated object and seems unable to understand the many projections and introjections of various groups in France as well as the mental representations of those in power and of the elites.

 

On the other hand, New Zealand is almost the complete opposite of France in this regard. Thanks to Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern’s extraordinary capacity to credibly emphasise societal-level empathy, New Zealand has been the closest to reparative leadership. Through the promotion of empathic availability and search for meaning, which reduces societal splitting, Ardern has achieved something that few politicians are willing and able to do.

Yet, while New Zealand’s adoption of an “Economics of Kindness” as reflected by the adoption of a wellbeing budget is groundbreaking, its policy framework remains nevertheless likely to fall short of transforming society psychosocially. When I attempted to reach the Prime Minister’s office to offer a Socio-Analytic Dialogue approach, I was directed to the Minister of Finance. Unfortunately, the latter’s response was that fiscal policy alone could achieve what was advocated. However, while economic policy has the tools to make society more equal and provide improved opportunities to its constituents, it is insufficient by itself as it does not allow for an understanding of how a country functions as a social system. This is regrettable as New Zealand has the capacity to set the tone, on behalf of the rest of the world, for reparative leadership.

 

Meanwhile, a genuine opportunity for Socio-Analytic Dialogue and transformational change has arisen in Morocco. The kingdom is interesting from a psychosocial perspective as the sense of doom that is seemingly prevalent in Western nations, all feeling a decline, is missing. While a large segment of the population is desperately disenfranchised and angry, an equally large share is feeling quite positive about a future that feels like it is improving for them. As a consequence, it is an unusually vibrant, hopeful and dynamic environment.

With its seemingly archaic power structure and significant economic inequalities, Morocco may seem an unlikely place to embark on a psychosocial journey. However, the country’s main public sector enterprise, OCP (Office Cherifien des Phosphates), is very dynamic and has been at the forefront of major social innovations which promote empowerment and human development. Furthermore, the authorities are keenly aware of the need to understand youth’s aspirations and frustrations in a complex and changing world.

The country decided to launch a process, which I was invited to lead, aimed at “listening” to Moroccan youth. While Morocco’s cultural heritage predisposes the country quite well for such an initiative, there nevertheless are some topics, such as corruption and power structure, especially regarding the King, that may lead to self-censorship or be, by law, off-limits. However, the authorities seem to understand that psychosocial discussions on affect, regardless of the topic, are apolitical and not conducive to increasing the propensity for dissent. Despite this, resistance to the process could nevertheless be on the increase. For example, a couple of group discussions sponsored by one of the governors (the latter directly appointed by the King) were abruptly cancelled. Furthermore, since the commencement of the process, there have been repeated requests to define the process and its outcome, in what could be an unconscious effort to control the process by restricting the range of topics.

A Socio-Analytic Dialogue approach may be experienced by the authorities as having the potential to challenge the social compact; the latter understood as having insulated the country from the negative, and in some cases catastrophic, impacts of the Arab Spring. Furthermore, the dynamism and vibrancy of Moroccan society alluded to earlier could, in a hubristic form of denial, foster beliefs that economic growth and diversification can, on its own, resolve the issues. This is, however, inconsistent with the reality on the ground. In discussions, a lot of the youth, despite their optimism, focused on one thing and one thing only: exiting the social system through emigration. And yet, this does not imply that there are wishes to attack the system, in large part due to the King being widely experienced as a positive object of identification. The latter strengthens Moroccan identity and, as such, renders the society more cohesive and makes it more resilient to psychosocial shocks. Yet, the system also knows the fragility of the existing equilibrium and could fall into a depressive state, wherein the system as a whole feels helpless. These dynamics coexist and create resistance to and ambivalence about engaging with psychosocial and system dynamics. Nevertheless, I remain cautiously optimistic.

 

 

In light of the vignettes describe above, and other acutely regressed defenses mobilized in many parts of the world against collective anxieties, I would argue that the world very much needs an understanding of societal level unconscious dynamics. As such, Morocco’s interest in thinking creatively about public policymaking should be seen as a “gift” to the rest of the world as it could set the stage for other nations to follow its example, and increase empathic availability and capability worldwide. 

Dr Bruno Bocarra
Founder Socio-Analytic Dialogue

10 February 2020

Is reparative leadership possible in 2020?

About Dr Boccara

Dr Bruno Boccara, is the founder of Socio-Analytic Dialogue, graduated from Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées in France and has two Ph.D.s (Civil Engineering and Economics), both from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the United States.

He has extensive policy experience: At the United Nations (World Bank) as Lead Economist on lending operations in Africa and Latin America and on governance and leadership issues worldwide; and in the financial markets (UBS and Standard & Poor’s) on a trading floor during the Asia crisis and as Director of Sovereign Ratings for Latin America.

He completed his psychoanalytic studies at the NYU School of Medicine Psychoanalytic Institute and also trained in organizational behavior, leadership coaching, and Group Relations.

Socio-Analytic Dialogue is conducted by a task specific team, consisting of economists, political scientists, and psychoanalysts trained to work on large group dynamics, in conjunction with a country-level team.

Dr Bruno Boccara’s book Socio-Analytic Dialogue: Incorporating Psychosocial Dynamics into Public Policies is available through amazon.

 

 

ps Are you a leader or manager and would like to learn more about systems psychodynamics? Have a look at the NIODA Master of Leadership and Management (Organisation Dynamics) course.

Is Reparative Leadership possible in 2020: Socio-Analytic Dialogue and its elusive quest by Dr Bruno Bocarra

‘Sorry Business’ Seminar: Dr Kate Dempsey

‘Sorry Business’ Seminar: Dr Kate Dempsey

Sorry Business Seminar: Dr Kate Dempsey

Sorry Business: A Kleinian perspective on Apology and Reparation seminar on 13 May 2020 in Melbourne

6-8 pm Wednesday 13 May 2020

Seminar, Melbourne, Australia

Dr Kate Dempsey (PhD)

Kate Dempsey is an organisational consultant who has successfully operated her own business, Kate Dempsey & Associates, for more than two decades. She assists businesses with change management and organisational review.

Prior to her consulting work, she held a number of positions in the public sector and throughout her career, she has been involved in many Boards and Committees – either appointed or elected to represent constituents.

In addition to her consulting work, Kate is an academic who has taught Leadership and Managing Change to Masters level students at Monash University and Latrobe University and also to Bachelor of Business students at Swinburne University since 2006. She has a PhD in the psychology of leadership.

‘Sorry business’ is a term used by First Nation People’s of Australia to encompass the rituals and ceremonies associated with death and grieving. But Australia has a sorry business, left unattended and unacknowledged. Colonisation in Australia (as elsewhere) has left a legacy of inequality, trauma, shame, guilt, and exploitation. In Requiem for a Nun, Faulkner writes the famous line that ‘the past is never dead. It’s not even past.’

In this paper, I argue that the past is still with us all (whether colonist/settler, migrant, dispossessed, white or black) and that lack of apology and reparation means wounds of the past do not heal. As a white Australian, I can’t say how, when or why apology is acceptable but I want to explore why apology is complex in a social context and how cultural forgetfulness negatively impacts on reparation.

I look at attempts to say sorry, from a Kleinian perspective, incorporating her idea of reparation and I use restorative justice principles – most often employed in the criminal justice system – as a guide to enacting apology. Klein deals with personal relationships, not whole societies or cultures and not with formal apologies given by governments or organisations on behalf of large groups for the deeds of those who came before. But perhaps illumination can occur by examining her ideas. She notes that the move to a depressive position comes first from the one who has done wrong, realising this truth, mourning loss and wanting to repair.

But if apology has an unspoken aim to triumph over a past, or has a sentiment of grievance, anger, or guilt at its heart, it is ‘manic reparation’ (Klein 1935). This is the fantasy desire that the division being experienced should go away. It is the belief that by simply apologising we can return to a place of oneness, to have the other stop complaining or have the feeling of guilt for damage done, assuaged. It is fantasy and therefore manic because the damage has in fact been done and the prior state can never return. Relationship with the other is damaged by past events and apology is only true when this brokenness is acknowledged and responsibility accepted.

Reparation is an embodied, enacted and relational process. Without reparation, we cannot move as individuals or as a nation to a mature (depressive) position. The task is to find the liminal space so that growth can occur, rather than all parties feeling either overwhelmed by what we cannot fix or defensively assuming all will be well following apology.

Finally, I discuss the term Dadirri (Ungunmerr 1988) from the Daly River People (the Ngangikurungkurr) as a way for white settler descendants to begin to come to a place of remembering and mourning that offers both an internal maturing in the depressive position, but also an outward enactment of reparation. It is a term that has no comparable meaning in English. But it points the way to quiet listening and deep understanding of the other, which is a good place to start.

Klein, M. (1935/1975) ‘A Contribution to the Psychogenesis of Manic-Depressive States’ Writings Vol 1. Free Press (Macmillan) NY. Available at https://www.sas.upenn.edu/~cavitch/pdf-
library/Klein_Contribution.pdf

Ungunmerr, MR. (1988) Dadirri: Inner Deep Listening and Quiet Still Awareness accessed 2.02.2019 from www.miriamrosefoundation.org.au

 

Sorry Business seminar: Dr Kate Dempsey

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Dr Kate Dempsey seminar

6-8 pm Wednesday 13th May 2020

Level 7, 341 Queen Street, Melbourne

For only:

* $65 including light refreshments

* Special $35 for members of Alumni of Organisation Dynamics (AODA)

Places limited .. don’t miss out!

When & Where

Dr Kate Dempsey seminar

Date

Wednesday 13 May 2020

Time

6 – 8 pm

Location

Level 7, 341 Queen Street, Melbourne Australia

About NIODA

The National Institute of Organisation Dynamics Australia (NIODA) offers internationally renowned post-graduate education and research, and decades of experience consulting with Australian organisations. In 2018, their annual Symposium will explore the dynamics of interoperability and work within the emergency and trauma sectors.

The study of organisation dynamics brings together socio-technical and psychoanalytic disciplines to explore the unconscious dynamics that exist in every group, team or organisation. Learning more about these theories, and reflecting on the experience of them, can support leaders and managers to unlock great potential in their organisations, tackling issues through a whole new light.

Contact

info@nioda.org.au

Get In Touch

PO box 287, Collins Street West,
Melbourne  8007  Australia
+61 414 529 867
info@nioda.org.au

This Get In Touch form is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Teamwork is Destroying Organizations

Teamwork is Destroying Organizations

Teamwork is Destroying Organizations:
Kenwyn K Smith public lecture

Professor Smith’s most recent book is titled The Abundance-Scarcity Paradox.  He is currently working on a book to be titled: Teamwork is Destroying Organizations.

6-8 pm Wednesday 18 March 2020

Teamwork is Destroying Organizations: Public Lecture, Melbourne, Australia

Professor Kenwyn K Smith (PhD)

Dr Kenwyn Smith is Professor of Organizational Behavior at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a scholar-practitioner who teaches leadership, group and intergroup dynamics, organisational politics and change management to students in multiple Penn graduate programs. During his years at Penn Kenwyn has directed the Center for Workplace Studies, functioned as Faculty Master of Ware College House, created Penn’s Graduate Program in Nonprofit Leadership (a partnership among multiple schools), and until 2012 served as its inaugural director.

Dr Smith, an Australian citizen, has conducted research in a wide range of organisations and communities: from prisons to schools, from businesses to health care institutions, from state enterprises to social entrepreneurial activities, from oppressed black townships in South Africa to agencies creating sustainable livelihoods in rural India, from pharmaceuticals in Belgium to financial services in urban America, from the World Bank to a community in Philadelphia wrestling with the anguish of people living with HIV/AIDS.

During his professional life, he has helped found a number of volunteer-based, nonprofit organizations, has worked on six continents and has been involved in the education of students from over 100 countries, both at Penn and around the world.

Internationally he is best known for four of his books:

  • Paradoxes of Group Life (co-authored with David N. Berg),
  • MANNA in the Wilderness of AIDS: Ten Lessons in Abundance,
  • Yearning for Home in Troubled Times
  • Groups in Conflict: Prisons in Disguise.

His most recent book, published in 2019, is titled The Abundance-Scarcity Paradox.

Professor Smith is currently working on three books to be titled:

  • The Heart of Leadership: Lessons from Lincoln, Gandhi and Mandela,
  • Teamwork is Destroying Organizations,
  • Healing Economics.

It is time someone says this. Since no one else is blurting it out, I will. “Teamwork” is destroying organizations. This is not a call to reinforce individualism or to shun the value of unity. To the contrary. Organizations are always dependent on the functionality of their work groups.

When organizations first asked employees to become team players they hoped to create a more collaborative workforce while also insisting “to be successful we must compete!” Such dual messaging confuses workers, erodes managerial effectiveness and shreds executive credibility.

What prompted organizational leadership to fixate on teamwork?

  • Was there a specific problem they were trying to address?
  • Were they trying to puncture the long-standing preoccupation with individualism?
  • What did the executives think had made their employees insufficiently collaborative?
  • Had the bosses decided to build a more collaborative relationship with the workers?
  • Were they getting ready to financially reward employees who behaved cooperatively?

In this public lecture, Professor Smith will focus on the issues of deception, under-boundedness and political dynamics and elements of the Abundance-Scarcity Paradox.

Teamwork is Destroying Organizations: Kenwyn K Smith public lecture

Day(s)

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Kenwyn Smith public lecture

6-8 pm Wednesday 18th March 2020

Zoom live interactive online session

For only:

* $35 per attendee

* Special $20 for board, committee members, staff, students & alumni of NIODA

Places limited .. don’t miss out!

When & Where

Teamwork is Destroying Organizations: Dr Kenwyn Smith public lecture

Date

Wednesday 18 March 2020

Time

6 – 8 pm

Location

Zoom online interactive session

About NIODA

The National Institute of Organisation Dynamics Australia (NIODA) offers internationally renowned post-graduate education and research, and decades of experience consulting with Australian organisations. In 2018, their annual Symposium will explore the dynamics of interoperability and work within the emergency and trauma sectors.

The study of organisation dynamics brings together socio-technical and psychoanalytic disciplines to explore the unconscious dynamics that exist in every group, team or organisation. Learning more about these theories, and reflecting on the experience of them, can support leaders and managers to unlock great potential in their organisations, tackling issues through a whole new light.

Contact

info@nioda.org.au

Get In Touch

PO box 287, Collins Street West,
Melbourne  8007  Australia
+61 414 529 867
info@nioda.org.au

This Get In Touch form is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Writing & Editorial Workshop 2020

Writing & Editorial Workshop 2020

Writing & Editorial Workshop

This workshop aims to help participants become authors of their written pieces; to discover the role of author; to allow their imagination to flourish. It also looks to the fundamentals of good writing and editing.

Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday 6-9 May

Four-day Writing & Editorial Workshop, live interactive online

Dr Susan Long

Dr Susan Long, author of many books and peer-reviewed articles, is offering a writing
workshop for those who want to find the genuine author in themselves. Writing can take many forms: academic theses, research reports, persuasive items, business reports, journalistic pieces, novels and poems. Although having different purposes and audiences, all writing can be creative, and all messes can be cleaned up later.  This workshop aims to help participants become authors of their written pieces; to discover the role of author; to allow their imagination to flourish. It also looks to the fundamentals of good writing and editing.

In the Writing workshop, participants will approach questions such as:
Why do I want to publish?
Who is my audience?
How do I choose a journal or publisher?
What do reviewers and editors look for?
How can I manage time for writing?
How do I present and develop an argument?
How should I work with case study material?
How can I understand and develop my style?
There will be time for writing and gaining feedback.

In the Publishing and editing day participants will be:
Introduced to the processes involved in the publication of edited work (as background to the editing process);
Introduced to the processes involved in editorial work;
Engaged in editing work that they have prepared in draft form;
Provided the opportunity for editing work that is not their own.

‘And by the way, everything in life is writable about if you have the outgoing guts to do it, and the imagination to improvise. The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt.’
– The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath

‘The idea of just wandering off to a cafe with a notebook and writing and seeing where that takes me for awhile is just bliss.’
– J. K. Rowling

Writing & Editorial Workshop

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Writing & Editorial Workshop

9.30 am Wednesday 6th May to 4.30 pm Saturday 9th May 2020 live interactive online

You have the option to attend either:

* The full four-day writing and editorial workshop for $1,200

* The three-day writing workshop for $900

* The publishing and editing one-day only for $300.  Please note: Participants must have completed the three-day writing workshop with Susan Long either immediately prior to this day or previously and bring a near-final draft piece of their own writing.

 

Places limited .. don’t miss out!

When & Where

Writing & Editorial Workshop

Date

Writing days Wednesday 6th May to Friday 8th

Editorial day Saturday 9th May 2020

Time

9.30am Wednesday – 4.30 pm Saturday

Location

Live interactive online via zoom due to COVID-19

About NIODA

The National Institute of Organisation Dynamics Australia (NIODA) offers internationally renowned post-graduate education and research, and decades of experience consulting with Australian organisations. In 2018, their annual Symposium will explore the dynamics of interoperability and work within the emergency and trauma sectors.

The study of organisation dynamics brings together socio-technical and psychoanalytic disciplines to explore the unconscious dynamics that exist in every group, team or organisation. Learning more about these theories, and reflecting on the experience of them, can support leaders and managers to unlock great potential in their organisations, tackling issues through a whole new light.

Contact

info@nioda.org.au

Get In Touch

PO box 287, Collins Street West,
Melbourne  8007  Australia
+61 414 529 867
info@nioda.org.au

This Get In Touch form is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

‘Close to home’ my reality of fire in Australia

‘Close to home’ my reality of fire in Australia

'Close to home' my reality of fire in Australia

As I am writing to you I am receiving notifications that the fires have spotted into the town of Eden. We still have fire on the mountain next to us but it is currently contained.

‘Close to home’ my reality of fire in Australia by Robyn Hartley

‘Close to home’ my reality of fire in Australia. 

I want to share with you my journey…

I live in Brogo NSW. Our local communities of Cobargo and Quaama were devastated on new years eve, two among many.
We evacuated at 3 am realising we couldn’t fight it.  We made it out just before our highway turnoff was burnt. We came back a day later as the hill on our property was still on fire and we thought we could help to put it out. We couldn’t but the wind was in our favour. We only lost a part of our fencing.
We improved our fire fighting ability only to be evacuated a few days later at 4 am, when they predicted the possibility of catastrophic conditions. We came back again a day later delivering supplies to neighbours that hadn’t left their properties. There was a fire on two of our neighbours’ properties.  Containment processes were carried out.
Again we improved our fire fighting capacity and determined we were ready. On the third time, we were advised to leave we decided the conditions were ones we could defend against. Luckily we didn’t have to. The water bomber came to put out the fire at one of our neighbours’ places.
On Sunday we met with our community as we listened to stories of people losing their homes or successfully defending. It is a community in shock.
As I am writing to you I am receiving notifications that the fires have spotted into the town of Eden.
We still have fire on the mountain next to us but it is currently contained. Rain is predicted tomorrow or the next day so I will probably be able to unpack the car for the first time in two weeks.
I wanted to share this level of detail with you because of the role NIODA played in this process. It was the deep integration of my understanding of leadership and taking up my role / own authority that consolidated at the last GRC that I consciously drew on, as well as my spiritual practice. My partner drew on the ‘strength that was coming through me’ which meant she could further draw on her own strength.
It helped me to; stay present to the changing conditions as we prepared our property, to manage my fear and to lean into the boundary to make decisions, to both go and then to stay, based on data that was in the now.
I want to express my deep gratitude for the space NIODA and all of the other organisations around the world hold, for deep and true learning about what leadership really is. That learning made a difference in a life-challenging situation.
A heartfelt thank you for the much-needed work that you do. This country and the world is crying out for true leadership to show up more. Know that you make a difference.
With love and gratitude,
Robyn

Robyn Hartley
Master of Leadership and Management (Organisation Dynamics) Student, NIODA

14 January 2020

‘Close to home’ my reality of fire in Australia

Are you a leader or manager and would like to learn more about group dynamics? Have a look at the NIODA Master of Leadership and Management (Organisation Dynamics) course.

‘Close to home’ my reality of fire in Australia by Robyn Hartley

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